Here are some studies about the effect of dietary antioxidants and photoaging prevention:

Antioxidants from Plants Protect against Skin Photoaging (2018)

Note: Very good comprehensive article explaining the vital role of dietary antioxidants in prevention and healing of skin photodamage from sun exposure.

 

Skin Photoaging and the Role of Antioxidants in Its Prevention (2013)

Note: Technical overview of how dietary antioxidants prevent photoaging from sun exposure.

 

Immediate Effects of UV Radiation on the Skin: Modification by an Antioxidant Complex Containing Carotenoids (2003)

Conclusion: Study tested an antioxidant complex supplement on 25 people for its ability to increase UV tolerance. Subjects took it daily for 7 weeks and were exposed to UV radiation to test their responses. Results showed that consuming the supplement caused a measurable increase in UV tolerance, raising the MED (minimal erythemal dose) and reducing sunburn cell counts in skin biopsies.

 

Role of Topical and Nutritional Supplement to Modify the Oxidative Stress (2002)

Conclusion: Randomized clinical trial of 30 elderly women tested the effectiveness of an antioxidant supplement on its ability to reduce post-UVB exposure oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, free radical generation, and reactive oxygen species generation. Results: “Oxidative stress and consequently lipids peroxidation decreased from 30 to 40% (P < 0.005) in blood serum of all the subjects treated with antioxidant compounds topically and by oral route. Both free radicals recovered in blood serum and on skin (in vivo) and ROS induced by irradiation of leucocytes with UVB light (in vitro), appear sensibly lower in subjects antioxidant-treated. Oxidative stress and consequently lipids peroxidation decreased from 30 to 40% (P < 0.005) in blood serum of all the subjects treated with antioxidant compounds topically and by oral route…. Both free radicals recovered in blood serum and on skin (in vivo) and ROS induced by irradiation of leucocytes with UVB light (in vitro), appear sensibly lower in subjects antioxidant-treated.”

 

Evidence for Antioxidant Nutrients-Induced Pigmentation In Skin: Results of a  Clinical Trial (1997)

Conclusion: Randomized control trial tested antioxidant supplements on 20 subjects to determine the effect of dietary antioxidants on skin melanin. The supplement blends were two different mixtures of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta carotene, and lycopene. Participants took the supplements for 8 weeks and both groups enjoyed a significant, consistent increase in skin melanin concentration throughout the study.

 

Systemic Protection by Antioxidants Against UVL-Induced Erythema (1978)

Conclusion: Control trial where scientists were able to double the MED (UV tolerance) of hairless mice by feeding them an antioxidant-supplemented diet.

 

 

Also see photoaging studies of

Vitamin E

Vitamin C

Astaxanthin

Carotenoids

Cocoa

Selenium

Green Tea

Coffee

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