Here are some studies about vitamin D and oral health:

 

Fighting Dental Caries In Kids: Could Vitamin D Be The Secret Weapon?

Note: Article from the toothpaste maker Colgate on the importance of vitamin D for dental health.

 

Vitamin D and Dental Caries in Children (2015)

Conclusion: Vitamin D levels and dental caries history were measured in 1,017 Canadian children. “ Our findings suggest that optimal vitamin D concentrations (≥75 nmol/L) are associated with a 39% lower odds for dental caries and overall caries experienced in young school-aged children.” (Editor note: many vitamin D researchers now consider 75 nmol/L to be inadequate.)

 

Prenatal Vitamin D and Dental Caries in Infants (2014)

Conclusion: 207 mother-infant pairs were evaluated for vitamin D levels and dental caries in the children. The mothers had their vitamin D levels tested during pregnancy and then the infants were evaluated 1-2 years later on. The vitamin D levels of the expecting mothers were very bad with 90% having levels below the recommended minimum, 32% of them having levels below 14 ng/ml, and only 12% having levels above 30 ng/ml. The mothers who were tested during winter had much lower levels than the mothers who were tested during summer. Enamel hypoplasia was found in 22% of the infants and 36% were found to have dental caries (which correlates closely with the percentage of mothers badly deficient in vitamin D). Mothers of infants with dental caries had much lower prenatal vitamin D levels.

 

Vitamin D Status of Children with Severe Early Childhood Caries: A Case–Control Study (2013)

Conclusion: 144 Canadian children with severe cases of dental cavities had their vitamin D levels tested and compared to 122 age-matched cavity-free control children. Children with dental cavities had “significantly lower” vitamin D levels compared to the cavity-free children. 86% of the children who took a vitamin D supplement belonged to the cavity-free group. Children with sub-optimal vitamin D levels were found to be twice as likely to have dental cavities.

 

One-year Effects of Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation on Chronic Periodontitis (2011)

Conclusion: 51 dental clinic patients were enrolled in a year-long study where half were given a low daily dose of vitamin D and calcium. Those receiving the supplements showed slightly better dental health.

 

Association Between Serum Concentrations of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Gingival Inflammation (2005)

Conclusion: People with higher vitamin D levels suffer less gingival inflammation

 

Association Between Serum Concentrations of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 and Periodontal Disease in the US Population (2004)

Conclusion: People with higher vitamin D levels over the age of 50 suffer fewer incidences of periodontal disease.

 

Destructive Periodontal Diseases in Minority Populations (2003)

Conclusion: This article covers a multitude of studies that have found American blacks and American hispanics generally suffer much poorer dental health compared to American whites. Maybe it’s a socioeconomic thing and they can’t afford dentist visits. Maybe it’s a lifestyle thing. Or maybe it’s because vitamin D has been proven to be crucially important in dental and skeletal health, as vitamin D is required by the body to absorb calcium, and dark-skinned people in the west generally have lower vitamin D levels, which would contribute to tooth decay and poor oral health. 
Also see: Health Studies Regarding Skin Color, Vitamin D, and Racial Health Disparities

 

Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements Reduce Tooth Loss in the Elderly (2001)

Conclusion: In a three year-long randomized control trial involving 145 subjects over the age of 65, those who took calcium and vitamin D supplements had better tooth retention compared to the placebo group.

 

Prevalence and Risk Indicators for Destructive Periodontal Diseases in 3 Urban American Minority Populations (2001)

Conclusion: This study found that American blacks suffer poorer oral and dental health compared to Asians and Hispanics. Although this study did not explore vitamin D as a factor, vitamin D has been proven to be a crucial factor in good oral/dental health and dark-skinned people tend to also suffer disproportionately from vitamin D-deficiency.
Also see: Health Studies Regarding Skin Color, Vitamin D, and Racial Health Disparities

 

Mean Annual Hours of Sunshine and the Incidence of Dental Caries (1939)

Conclusion: This study measured the dental cavity incidence among 94,337 white pre-teen boys through the United States. Boys living in the sunniest areas of America had the fewest cases of dental decay and boys living in the least sunny areas of America had the highest rate of dental decay. Boys living in very sunny areas such as San Diego, California had half the dental decay rates of boys living in the least sunny areas like Portland, Oregon.

 

The Influence of a Cereal-Free Diet Rich in Vitamin D and Calcium on Dental Caries in Children (1932)

Note: This article covers multiple studies that have found children who get more vitamin D have healthier teeth.

 

 

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